Woman Gets $300 From Bank Of America ATM, Quickly Spots She’s Being Scammed. Demands Answers

Updated November 21, 2017

Most people use ATM machines on a regular basis. While the majority of purchases can be made via credit card, there is still a great need to carry cash around and use it for tips and other “cash-only” places. It’s pretty routine to go to your local ATM machine, take out some cash and stuff it in your wallet, but one woman’s recent experience might make you want to check those bills thoroughly before filing them away in your wallet.

When Darcy Fox took $300 she noticed something odd about one of the twenty dollar bills in her hand. There was no doubt in her mind that the bill was fake. Fox was floored that the bank could make such a major mistake as the false bill was obvious. Not only was Andrew Jackson’s face distorted on one side of the bill, but instead of saying “United States of America,” on the other side, it said, “Motion Picture Use Only.”

Yikes, this was a major mistake made by the bank. Fox immediately went into the bank to show them the fake money, and while they replaced the bill, it left a very unsettling feeling in her, so she decided to take it a step further and ask the teller a few questions…

“How widespread is this? Where did the fake money come from? How did it get into your system?”

In comparison to an earlier incident that happened, Fox is lucky that the bank replaced her money right away and that it was obviously counterfeit looking. Back in 2012, a man named William Hagman withdrew $2,500 from his account at TD Bank. He then took the cash to a Bank of America, where he had planned to deposit it in a different account. The teller at the Bank of America noticed that one of his one hundred dollar bills was counterfeit, and shocked by the situation, Hagman immediately took the bill back to TD Bank. While the bank acknowledged the error, they refused to replace his bill with a legit one.

After Fox’s incident, Bank of America ensured her that this is an isolated incident and that there are safeguards in place that are supposed to prevent this from happening. The bank also plans to report the incident to Secret Service in hopes of preventing it from happening in the future.

Fox certainly learned from the incident and would like others to do the same. She is encouraging ATM users to be vigilant about checking their cash when they take it out.

“I mean, this is blatantly fake money. The bank isn’t supposed to miss these things,” said Fox.

Evidently, banks don’t typically replace money after the customer has left the building, which makes if even more important to check the money as soon as you receive it.

Commenters are doubting that the bill came out of the ATM in the first place and shared the following opinions…

“I don’t think the bank would work in an ATM. It is excessively wrinkled and has a tear. Have you ever noticed how flat and crisp your bills are that come from an ATM? I am questioning this story.”